Rules of Caribbean Stud Poker

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Caribbean Stud along with Pai Gow poker, Three Card poker and a few more poker games are designed to be played against the house, and not against other players. Therefore you can find these games in the general casino space next to blackjack, roulette, craps and other casino games, and not in separated card rooms.

Before the game of Caribbean Stud begins, each player places his bet in from of him. Caribbean Stud tables, as most other casino games, have the minimum and the maximum betting limit, therefore this bet must be between these limits, but sometimes the dealer may alter the betting limits if it is required by the rules of the game. After all players place their bets, five cards are dealt to each player including the dealer. The players cards are all dealt face-down, while one of the dealer’s cards is turned face-up. Then starting from the player to the dealer’s left and proceeding in the clockwise direction, all players decide and declare whether they want to stay in the game or not. A player, who decides to stay in, must add an amount equal to his initial bet to the betting area. A player, who declares out, automatically loses his bet and does not participate in the further play.

Once all players have decided whether they stay in the game or not, the dealer flips over his four face-down cards. At this stage the dealer checks if his hand is an Ace-King or better, which means a hand that contains an ace And a King, any pair or a better poker hand. If it does not, the dealer does not qualify, and all players are paid even money on their bets without even revealing their cards. If the dealer qualifies, the players reveal their hands and compare them to the dealer’s one. If the dealer’s hand beats the player’s hand, the player loses his bet. If the player’s hand beats the dealer’s hand, the player is paid according to the hand he has as follows:

This is a standard Caribbean Stud pay-table, but it can vary from table to table, and besides, can be changed according to the table stakes. So, at a low stakes table, such as a quarter or a nickel table, this pay-table may be cut, not offering 100 to 1 on Royal Flush. The stakes themselves can also be adjusted to the bank, and the dealer may not allow stakes that are too high even if they are allowed by the table limits, if he does not have enough money to pay Royal Flush with the bank he has.